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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 73 (some duplicates have been removed)
, john paul ii, his predecessor was 85 and he could barely walk and speak. he was mumbling and he still didn't resign. and so, a pope has not resigned for 700 years, and so nobody expected really this to happen. and this to happen so soon. out of the blue, without any indications that he would make such a drastic announcement that, that came as a shock to pretty much everybody. he made the announcement in a small congregation of cardinals here in the vatican just behind me, and certainly didn't make a big speech or announcement about it meaning that even as you mentioned the spokesperson was not aware and the closest aides with were not aware so that means that the pope has made a long and thoughtful consideration of his strength and he just decided that he does not have it anymore and he wants somebody else to take his place as the leader of the world's catholics. >> all right. claudio lavanya and i know that you have a busy day and month ahead of you and even busier than you thought it would be. claudio, he of course, will be checking in a lot today and goingfogo going forth. and vati
wanted to retire when he worked for john paul ii, asked him, john 35u8 ii, would not let that happen. he became pope after john paul ii died, but he never seemed to enjoy it the way john paul ii did, who was an actor. benedict is a scholar, a theologian, an intellectual, and today you could see the humility that those who know him very well say have always marked this 85-year-old man. >> certainly describing himself as a pilgrim is really extraordinary, and you get the feeling that the crowd, the audiences were responding to him in an emotional way that they hadn't previously. that i guess it's the moment the history, but also the sadness. i mean, this is a very bittersweet moment. >> well, it's -- it is. that's exactly the way to describe it. you know, it's interesting in st. peters square, they had the big jumbotrons out there, and people were gathered around and were actually silent in st. peters square watching what happened, and the last time i heard that kind of silence in st. peters square it was when they announced the death of john paul ii. you never heard a cell phone go off. y
ornamental gardens, as a small farm. john paul ii took wonderful walks here. benedict xvi i'm told is a much, much more private man, expected to spend a long time in his rooms here. he'll be here for about two months while they restore his home at the vatican where he will eventually spend the rest of his life. guys? >> all right, becky anderson, thank you very much. we'll check back in with you. >>> here to help us walk through today is monsignor rick hi hillgartner. i wanted to walk through what is going to happen today when the pope meets with the cardinals. can you walk us through that? >> sure. >> yesterday in st. peter's square there were upwards of 50,000 people or more giving that public witness. this will be the most with his closest collaborators over the years. the pope's personal collaborators are the bishops throughout the world and in a particular way it's the cardinals standing at the heart of those, many of the cardinals of the people who workday to day in the vatican who work with the pope on a regular basis. who see him week in, week out. the rest of the cardinals spread th
april 2005 who took over for the immensely popular pope john paul ii. his papacy has been marked by controversy. the pope criticized for how he handled the situation in his prior jobs when he was archbishop in germany and later a top vatican official. on a visit to america in 2008, he became the first pope to meet with the victims themselves. on a lighter note, benedict has become known as his personal idiosyncracies like his bright red shoes. he's been using a moveable platform to carry him down the aisle of st. peters basilica. this morning after he made his announcement, he was helped down from his chair. while this is a surprise the pope has said in the past that he reserved the right to resign if he felt too old to perform his duties. what's next? he still hopes to serve the church through a life dedicated to prayer. elizabeth, back to you. >> greg, good morning to you. lot of people really surprised by the announcement this morning. some cardinals in the audience didn't understand what pope benedict was saying? >> that's also true. one of those occasions in rome the pope ac
. >> and john paul would have been. >> a movie star. >> that gives you a sense of the different temperaments. yet the emotion that is now being really demonstrated as these cardinals say farewell face to face for the last time, all of them kissing the fisherman's ring which we know will be defaced and destroyed which benedict xvi's papacy ends. >> that's right. there are two instruments of the papal office, one is the ring and one is the official papal seal. the seal is kept in a safe in an office in the vatican. of course in the middle ages as you know, christiane be these were what were used to stamp paper bulls. which made them official. after a papacy had ended, someone might use the instruments to falsify papal documents. that's where the custom of destroying them came from. that will be honored at the end of benedict's papacy as well. >> thank you. we'll continue to watch this with all of you. back to you, john and zoraida in new york. >> it is interesting to see this as history is being made at the vatican. pope benedict xvi saying good-bye to the cardinals who have assembled and many
suffering is meant to respond to that. he's well aware of what john paul ii did, for instance, stay in office until the very end, suffering physically. and in an extreme and public way was legitimate. he's saying, given the situation -- >> and as you look back over his -- >> such that he's -- so far. >> excuse me, father. as you look back over his papacy, what will he will remembered most for? >> i think he'll be remembered, above all, as a teaching pope for his books about the life, his encyclicals. the books about the life of jesus have been profound. it will take years to unpack all of the profundity of his thought. he's done a great service to the church already in his service to john paul ii. >> father john wauck, thank you very much. the first pope to have an account on twitter. >> the first pope ever to tweet. he's 85 years old. pope john paul ii was 84 when he died. wlerned after he died he considered twice resigning because of his ill health. this sets up a political process with the conclave electing the next pope. dan harris joining us on this discussion. it was a quick p
was elected as a caretaker pope. following john paul ii. that was a hard act to follow. they were looking for an elderly pontiff who would not be in position for that long and also there was no way anybody was going to top john paul ii in terms of charisma, in reaching out to the young, and, unfortunately, they didn't get a salgzman for catholicism in this particular pope, which will be a very important ingredient for the next one. >> he also had the burdens of dealing with the scandals after 27 years of john paul ii. he had to focus on the apology, the fact that he had actually met individually in his role as cardinal ratzinger investigating some of the problems of the abuse in the american church. >> he did go some way in terms of, you know, issuing an apology from the pope as a pretty lofty ideal, but, many of the, we still have a problem, many of the, worldwide with the sex scandal and the catholic church. they haven't addressed it at all levels. the vatican can pools. they can set lawsuits. there are a lot of damaged people out there who were basically abused as children, and no matt
than eight years ago when pope benedict xvi succeeded pope john paul ii. we woke up this morning to the news he will only lead the church for a few more weeks. he will resign citing his age and lack of strength. this is the first time this has happened in 600 years. historic occasion. a lot of speculation as to who will succeed pope benedict. >> eric: you lied? it was 598 years. >> kimberly: okay. >> eric: i may have a different take on this. i think he is doing the right thing. the pope, rather than this is what happens. the pope dies and we go through the burial, the funeral, the burials. meanwhile, the group that decides who the next pope will be scrambles to hurry up and put another pope in. he is giving everyone ample time to think about it. give two weeks before he retires and they are already picking names. we have potential names. he did the right thing. look at the business. you wouldn't throw a company in to, where you lose your founder or you lose your president because he dies and they try to scram to believe figure out who will replace him, ala steve jobs. nice trans
predecessor pope john paul ii. americans are saying perhaps there needs to be a new direction. 51% say it should stay the same. what sort of reforms do you think should happen? >> you're asking me the $64 million question. but i think definitely we have to keep continuing to involve the laypeople. we don't have enough priests. we should have more priests. we should work on that. the holy father has done that. bishops around the country, around the world have done that. we haven't done it well enough. we must keep praying for it. we must keep attracting the young people, priests and religious, too. we need wonderful religious women to continue the teaching functions, the peacemaking function of our world. >> do you think, as some have subjected, including cardinal o'brien because of the problems that he's in, have decided not to come to this conclave but he said that he thought it was time that priests should be allowed to marry. that discussion should happen. 58% of american catholics think the priests should be allowed to marry. can you imagine that happening and do you think that wou
to meet the pope then john paul the 2nd. then what happened happened and my mother found herself representing bill clinton to the pope. >> how exciting for her. >> it was a challenge. >> i guess it was. >> e.j. this morning quotes somebody who says the most noted earnize i earnizing -- modernizing thing this pope did was to retire, get out of the way. could it be at this modern age a pope just can't afford to be seen frail and weakened in the 24/7 news cycle? are we moving beyond the days? >> i don't think that's necessarily true. john paul felt strongly he wanted the world to see him in a sickened state because that was humanity. that he was setting an example of someone who was frail and feeble and carrying on. i think this pope, you know, has decided to set a different example. we'll see what this precedent means. does it mean future popes have to be pushed out? does he have influence after a new pope is manamed? we're in unchartered waters. >> and in quite a while, we'll see -- >> they have their own camp david. >> with the choicloisted nuns. they'll probably get better food.
all been nominated by pope benedict or his predecessor john paul ii. i think there's that sense of a new, fresh start for the church. >> you say that the cardinals in some ways want to distance themselves from the scandals that are surrounding the church but how do they do this when a cardinal like roger mahoney of los angeles is allowed to vote in the conclave for a new pope at the very time he is accused of protecting priests of sexually abused children? >> reporter: yes, well this is of course one of the major scandals that has overshadowed the church in the last 30 years, the last ten years specifically this has come out and i think it's one of the things which they will be very aware of in choosing the new pope it will have to be somebody who is able both to continue to monitor the consequences of that scandal, and at the same time bring a new sense of direction and a new idea of the future of the church to help people heal and kind of move away from that scandal. >> delia gallagher thank you, and we will see you in rome soon. >> a senior white hous
to do that. and that's why i think this particular move, very counterproductive. >> senators john paul and john mccain slammed the white house allegedly for leaking the plan on purpose. >> this is the prosecutor pea doing his own plan. it shows me he's really not serious. when they come out and say my way or the highway and if congress doesn't ask be with i'll put it on the desk and say pass it now, that's no way to get it done. but it seems to me to show the president really doesn't want immigration reform. >> leaks don't happen in washington by accident. this races the question that many of us continue to wonder about. does the president really want a result or does he want another reason to beat up republicans so he can get political advantage in the next election? >> he argued the white house plan and bipartisan negotiations shared some key elements. >> republican, this was leaked. it's also clear that it's incomplete. there's a silver lining in this which is that there are a lot of co commonalities between the two plans. >> was this intention by the white house to pressure congres
's not worn his heart on his sleeve. he's very different from his predecessor john paul ii who was all about hugs and embracing. yes, this was a day of rare emotion. you saw a lot of smiles as he went around st. peter's square in that pope mmobile to receive the final farewells. he spoke about how he had so much joy, he said, in the church in his eight years of reign but he also talked about how there had been difficult times. he said it had been fair from easy on occasion. he talk tbd church coming across agitated waters and finding themselves facing different directions of the wind. obviously he was talking about various crises and issues that the pope has to deal with and the church has to deal with,al those close to home who have rocked and buffeted those for years, most significantly the priests who have preyed upon young boy and an effort to hold those accountable, whose who did it and those who shielded the priests from scandal and accountability. all that is going on at the same time. more matterly as we await the conclave to convene and await the next pope, everybody's waiting. that
of ways like a battlefield, it has made a huge difference. in east philly, john paul jones middle school had a reputation. >> it used to be on lockdown. >> reporter: captured on a cell phone at a nearby middle school common here, too. mold, fleas and rats ravaged the library so badly school officials had to throw away thousands of books. >> when i first came, i was pretty nervous. i thought it was going to be a little scary. >> reporter: the nickname came before the bars on the windows and doors, "jones jail." last september, eighth grader travon williams says something happened. >> this became a whole new school. >> reporter: school district officials turned it into a charter school, gave it a new name and face lift and then called in the military. >> we needed to have people who are good role models and believe in education and development and people that had a commitment to america and who else but veterans? >> i enlisted when i was 17. my parents signed for me. >> reporter: patrick's father is a vietnam vet and a purple heart recipient. his older brother is a marine. since service wa
who make the pilgrimage here buy all sorts of le -- religious souvenirs. many still have pope john paul ii. the election of the new pope is also expected to bring an economic boom to rome. >> we're increasing all our services. social services. all of our security. >> reporter: 4 million pill pilgrims came for the last conclave in 2005. the city of rome is getting ready for the same number this time. at the vatican, danielle nottingham, wjz eyewitness news. >> and the vatican acknowledged for the first time that pope benedict hit his head in a hotel room during a trip to mexico last year. church officials say the accident has nothing to do with the pontiff's decision, though, to retire. >>> still ahead on eyewitness news. not a bad man. why two of ex-lapd christopher dorner's final victims say they felt compassion for their captor. >>> i'm bob turk in the first warning weather center. after a warmer friday, more wintry precip is possible. i'll have the exclusive first warning five-day forecast. >>> and here's today's cold, cough and flu repor
back in november, right? >> that's right. and when john paul ii when he was introduced to him by benedict he said i assure you he's made his first communion, he's so young. that's the comment that benedict made to john paul ii. why i'm interested in talking a bit about him is because he's so humble. when he was bishop in the philippines, he would ride his bicycle. he would encounter all the pool on the streets. he would invite the poor in his residence to eat. there's a story about a woman who was looking for her alcoholic out-of-work husband expecting to find him in the local bar, she found him in the residence with the bishop eating lunch. he spoke very vo shumbly at thet meeting that we need someone with a lot of humbleness and silence. people are saying, wow, wouldn't it be something. he's no slouch, he studied in america, summa cum laude . >> many people said it might be an opportunity to have an african as pope, and cardinal peter turksa of ghana. >> a few strikes against him, one he's already spoken about it to the press -- >> like the cia, forget it. >> he didn't say i
john paul decided that all those cases would now come to his office. so from 2001 to 2005, he saw every case. so he is the most knowledgeable person in the world about these issues. >> so what happened to these cases now? >> it's a very good question. i think it's the fundamental question for the church, because it's clear that these are crimes. they're not since, they're crimes. and they've also been covered up in a rather methodical way by the church around the world. >> your research took almost two years. and in your research, are these isolated incidents or is it habitual within the church? >> i think what you see is obviously not every priest is a pedophile. in fact, they're a rather small percentage of priests. but what you do see is patterns that emerge all over the world. for a long time, the vatican said oh, this was an american problem. but now we see this problem cropping up in australia, in germany, in brussels, in ireland, where it's been huge, in italy. so what you see in these -- you know, what you see is patterns. and the patterns are almost always of cover-up. instead
all been worked out by a decree that pope john paul ii came up with maybe three years before he died, and the critical moment which is sort of an answer to your question. the criminal moment is when each cardinal has the ballot in his hands, and before he puts it in the urn, he has to repeat an oath, and you're standing in front of michelangelo's last judgment, so that wall adds always to the deal. you have this in your hand. you say something like this. i can't translate it exactly from latin. you call upon the lord jesus, my savior, as my witness. he who will judge me. you are looking at the -- he who will judge me that the man i am voting for is the one who under god i believe god wants to be pope. in a certain sense it makes it not any more an election. it makes it a discernment. you are trying to figure out what you think god would want. what man you think god would want for all the needs of the church today. it's a fascinating moment. you do it every time you vote, so it's something -- you never can forget. >> well, i never knew that before. you bring this new information that
. the pope was perfectly okay yesterday to me and predecessor pope john paul survived two assassination attempts, various cancer scares, crippling arthritis, and you had parkinson's as well. yet he battled on for 27 years. it does seem on the face of it very strange that pope benedict would walk away amid all the scandals being told and in the media of a secret gay network of clergy inside the vatican, the financial mismanagement and the firing of archbishop cardinal keith o'brien of inappropriate behavior towards priests in the '80s. when you put it altogether, where are we left, do you think? >> i take the pope on his word. he is 85 years of age. his health is declining. he knows his health is going to continue to decline. i am not surprised. modern medicine can keep us physically alive long after we can do the kind of job that it requires to be, to have the strength, the mental ability to do that kind of job, so it was inevitable that sometime during the 21st century we have a pope resign for a reason like this. now, you know, with regards to all of these scandals and stories that ar
pope john paul ii. >> do you think this is overshadowed over a time that should be honoring pope benedict? >> yes. i think it is. he's a humble man, a very kind man. if you were to meet him and you're a nobody, he speaks to you as if you're the most important person in the world. he's a very humble world. in his heart, he's a good man. he loves the church and wants the best for the church. think about it. is there anyone in the world who has put down power willingly? >> certainly in this country. when is the conclave going to start? >> probably monday the congregations will begin and shortly there after they will start that conclave. they want a pope by easter. they know the world is watching them. it's important to the church and to the larger world. >> father, great to have you here. >> thank you. appreciate it. >>> that wraps up this hour of "jansing & co." i'm chris can jansing. the usual, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't
. i was here when pope john paul ii died in 2005, and it was completely different atmosphere. on this occasion, very much an opportunity for people, the faithful, to come and contemplate the legacy of pope benedict. many appreciated him as a teacher, a thinker, an intellectual. somebody who had the courage to confront many of the issues that have plagued the church over the last decade or so. the question of, for instance, pedophilia and the priesthood and other things. very much what they heard from people is they appreciated him as someone who faced and grappled with serious issues and appreciated the fact that he had the courage to step down at this point in his life. >> ben wedeman for thus morning. thank you for the update. you can hear them breaking down from the mass said a little bit this morning. here is what will happen from now on from here. pope benedict xvi has amended the conclave law. they don't have to wait for 16 days after the papacy is vacant. cardinals under the age of 80 will take part. four ballots a day. b ballots get counted twice daily. and dark smoke
who will be voting were appointed either by john paul ii or benedict xvi and on the big picture issues they are all of one mind. i think it's quite unlikely the next pope is going to ordain women or repeal church teaching on abortion or gay marriage or those kinds of issues. now on the other hand, i would certainly say from my own experience of talking to cardinals the more thoughtful among them realize the church has a woman's problem. they understand there are a lot of sisters who feel the same way as our guest does and it's not just nuns, lots of women generally feel that way. i think the next pope will face this difficult challenge of trying to reach out to women and assuring them there's a place for them in the church while at the same time drawing a line in the sand on the ordinary nation question. >> when you say that they're going to select the new pope and they're going to think outside the box and they're maybe going to south america or africa to choose the next pope, they're really not thinking outside the box though, are they? maybe they are in picking a pope from another c
choosing a quieter life. so very different from his predecessor john paul who stayed until the very end. anthony from pennsylvania witnessed both pope's last sermons. >> they're courage in different ways. in opposite ways but the same degree of courage. >> reporter: the pope summoning the strength to say good-bye, giving up one of the most powerful roles on earth. meeting publicly with the faithful one last time. >> savannah as the pope got up to leave. there was a wave of emotion. people calling out to him, waving good-bye. many people held up banners saying thank you in return. pope benedict told the faithful i have never felt this way. >> thank you. greg burke is the senior communications adviser just with the pope in the final audience. good morning it's good to see you. >> good morning. >> sometimes tone can be lost in translation. you heard this address. how does the pope seem to you these last few days? what's his mood? . he's a serene person. i have known him as cardinal ratzinger. he took a lot of hits from john paul ii. i see him now calmer than ever. he showed a little emotio
people who see, who saw in benedict and blessed john paul ii a voice that really resonates, a challenge, you can live this gospel. it's possible to bring love and truth and peace into the world, and we call it the kingdom of god, the rest of society calls it a better world. they're the same thing, to bring into this world peace, justice, truth, kindness, compassion, care, and that's what the pope keeps saying over and over and over again. the exciting thing is we have loads of new england people saying you know that's right, i'd like to be a part of that. >> cardinal wuerl, if you are elected pope we would like to have you back, come and join us on the set of the show. >> actually if you're elected pope we'll talk to you there. we don't want to talk to you here. we'll talk to you there. road trip, road trip. >>> trending this morning, i want to tell you for folks who don't want coffee in the morning there's a new mountain dew soda, a drink, why it's already controversial, that's ahead. (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infini
surprised now twice over. first with a pope from poland. a great pope, pope john paul, and pope benedict xvi, also great pope from germany. both were surprises. certainly in latin america there are enormous challenges and enormous opportunities. large numbers of the faithful who are deserting the church. we need to bring them back. in fact, pope benedict had a trip scheduled to brazil this summer for world youth day. that's going to be a significant moment. certainly the cardinals will be looking to north latin america, too, as one of the candidates. >> quickly monsignor, i don't know if you see the photo of lightning striking st. peter's just 24 hours after the announcement. was this some sort of sign? >> well, certainly -- i live just a couple of minutes here. i saw it myself. i'm a witness. and i think the holy -- god himself was saying to us, these are going to be exciting times for the church. i am with you, i am present with you, and did not be afraid to go forward and make the right and the best decision for the church and indeed for the world. >> that's what thought when you saw the
the last pope, one that we knew growing up, pope john paul ii, literally allowed the world to watch him die. that was part of the process of sharing life, willie. >> yeah. this pope says he's old and fragile, unable to travel, but you make a good point about the previous pope. john, we've heard many times now that the next pope, whoever that may be, will have to confront the sexual abuse scandal, puts it mildly. that has consumed the roman catholic church for so long. what will that mean exactly? what will a pope do? a new pope in terms of confronting that? will he come out immediately in an opening address? will he purge some of the priests? what do you think that pope will do at least from a public relations point of view to change the perception? >> well, it's the perception and the reality. it's the most disturbing thing about any self-protecting institution. you see this as the catholic chump has, for decade upon decade now, put its own institutional survival and its own institutional dignity, really, ahead of the interests of the weakest people in its care, its children. i think many
he addressed you first but he and benedict would chat when benedict was waiting to see pope john paul. >> completely open. >> reporter: what was he like to talk to? >> very -- he would ask me what my interests were and how i felt and how i saw things. >> reporter: and with a sense of humor, like when benedict offered to sign widmer's copy of a book that he written which was pretty thick. >> when i gave it to him he said, you're really reading this? and i said, i'm trying. he said, it helps to do it in small steps. >> reporter: but he also had a personal crisis as a guard, spending his first christmas away from home. john paul helped him through that. >> i sort of had a meltdown and right at that moment he comes out of his apartment and he noticed and he reached out to me and he thanked me for being there and he gave me courage. >> reporter: what were you doing? were you crying? >> yeah. >> reporter: you were? >> i stopped crying but he in theed my red eyes. >> reporter: as for what's to come, the top job isn't what we think. >> the pope is the end of your life. you have to give up all
was very much like a battlefield, it's made a huge difference. in east philly john paul jones middle school had a reputation. >> police used to come to this school. used to be on lockdown. >> fight like these captured from a cell phone from the nearby middle school were common here, too. mold, fleas and rats ravaged the library so badly school officials had to throw away thousands of books. >> when i first came, i was pretty nervous. i thought it was going to be a little scary. >> the nickname came before the bars on the windows and doors. jones jail. >> but last september eighth grader tre'von williams says something happened. >> this became a whole new school. >> school district officials turned it into a charter school, gave it a new name and facelift and then called in the military. >> we needed to have people who are good role models, who believe in education and believe in youth development, and people that had a commitment really to america, and who else but veterans? >> i enlisted when i was 17. my parents signed for me. >> patrick's father is a vietnam vet and a purple heart recipi
in 1996 by pope john paul ii and can only be changed by another pope. that is what benedict did at that. one of his last official acts. the pope gave his final sunday blessing to huge crowds in st. peter's square. no date has been set for the con chraf to begin, in order to to have a new pope by march 24th. the new pope would have to be installed by sunday, march 17th. hence why they had to get permission to move up the date. martha: everything moving forward on that whole time period right now. a little bit of news also this morning, lauren. we're learning about a cardinal in britain involved in some controversy decided no not to attend. he will tell us about that? >> reporter: martha, this is unprecedented. this really doesn't happen. we're in a season of unprecedented events. there will be one less cardinal attending the conclave, cardinal keith o'brien of scotland, england's highest ranking catholic leader is resigning as archbishop in the wake of allegations of misconduct. british newspapers report that o'brien was accused by three current priests or one former priest acting inappr
, and he looks frail, looks old, but he seemed to be enjoying himself. john paul ii is very much a more engaging pope and not as much as a private man as benedict xvi is. he will leave here tomorrow around this time, by helicopter, and he will go to castle gandolpho and come back to the vatican in his retirement. he'll go into isolation, he's chosen that for himself. the vatican garden cottage as it were, it's not particularly comfortable, i'm told, i haven't been in, but it is somewhere he can spend his twilight years as it were, and he's 85 years old, let's remember that, in peace and reflecting on where he is, who he is, and how far he's come. today was very much an occasion of reflection for the 100,000 or so people who were here, brooke. it was absolutely amazing. we were up there, right at vatican city there and it was a sense of quiet, even though there are over 100,000 people there, so i say, a time of reflection and peace for so many of the faith. brooke? >> and history being made and now less than 24 hours from now, where you are in rome, becky anderson, my thanks to you. >>>
in the developed world. the italians had a claim on the papacy a long time until john paul the iind now, they had a poll and german in the seat and i imagine they would be interested having it back in italy. at the same time, there is very good talent outside europe that might be able to lead the church. i think they'll look widely but won't be simply geographical, what kind of vision will they have going forward and considerations of age and health obviously in this case. i think all those will be on the table. >> they say you want to live in interesting times. certainly, we all are going to get a chance to watch how the pope's voice is absorbed into this discussion by the conclave, right? how much of a voice will he have in this? >> caller: i suspect he will have very little or none. if he's prudent, i don't think he will try to appoint his own successor, let the cardinals choose one of their own because they have to live with the decision. this is an unprecedented situation. popes don't generally pick their successors and i don't think he will. my suspicion is he will retreat from the process
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 73 (some duplicates have been removed)